The great Russian generalissimo Alexander Vasilyevich Suvorov loved to play soldiers from childhood, which is not surprising, because the boy was born into a military family and did not want another career. According to the tradition of the family, Alexander was sent to study in the cadet corps, and in the Semenovsky Regiment he began military service. Already in the middle of 1759, Suvorov participated in combat battles. Everything worked out quite well and the promotion of the career ladder went on as usual: the duty officer at the commander-in-chief, the colonel, the commander of the regiment.

During the hostilities of the Bar Confederation in 1769-1772, Suvorov showed himself to be a brilliant commander, and he was awarded the rank of Major General. For military services to the Fatherland he was awarded the Order of St. George. But one case darkened the career of the commander, during the war between Russia and Turkey, he personally decided to seize the garrison, which contradicted the will of Empress Catherine II. But, soon, the empress’s anger was replaced by mercy, and the disgraced commander was sent to search for Yemelyan Pugachevs. In 1786 he was awarded the rank of general-in-chief. During the Russian-Turkish war, which went down in history with the famous battles: the Battle of Kinburg, Izmail, Foksha. Suvorov proved to be a competent military strategist, and Russian troops suffered minimal losses.

The army, led by Alexander Vasilyevich, participated in the suppression of the Polish uprising of 1794, and five years later in the famous Italian campaign. The Generalissimo did not recognize templates, his main principles were tactical calculation and offensive. During his military career, the commander did not lose almost a single battle and was respected by the soldiers.

The Russian commander died on May 6, 1800, at the age of 69.